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A Filmmaking Blog | VashiVisuals

16

Oct
2017

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In David Fincher
Editing

By vashi

All 25 Subliminal Shots in David Fincher’s MINDHUNTER Netflix Title Sequence

On 16, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In David Fincher, Editing | By vashi

 

David Fincher is known for his creative and visually ground-breaking title sequences.

From the frenetic and kinetic jagged cuts of SE7EN to the CGI extravaganza of THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO to the North by Northwest inspired large static font in PANIC ROOM.

The Title Sequence is a chance for the filmmaker to set the tone and prepare the audience for the world they are about to enter.

In Fincher’s new NETFLIX show MINDHUNTER…the use of subliminal edits is used to cue the viewers to the violent world of serial killers.

 

All 25 images in the Mindhunter Netflix Title Sequence

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How I Created the First 6K Native Workflow for a Hollywood Feature Film

On 14, Oct 2017 | 3 Comments | In 6 Below, Editing, Premiere Pro | By vashi

 

Premiere Pro Timeline - Editing 6 Below the Movie

 

As a filmmaker, I always want to challenge myself both creatively and technically. I pursue projects that can stimulate me on several levels. If I am going to commit a year of my life to a feature film…it is crucial that I walk away with new skills, a successful storytelling experience and a lot of fun in the trenches with my team.

 

6 Below the Movie starring Josh Hartnett

 

 

THE BEGINNING

When I was asked by director Scotty Waugh to edit 6 BELOW…all my personal and professional requirements were met. All the checkboxes were ticked. The true story of Eric LeMarque, a professional hockey player, that went snowboarding and got trapped in a snowstorm on an isolated mountain for 8 days was riveting.

As fate would have it, Scotty didn’t know I knew Eric LeMarque when he asked me to edit the film. He didn’t know that Eric and I both played professional hockey together 15 years earlier. That only added to the immense sense of responsibility I had to deal with in telling his true story in the best manner possible. The conflict of editor versus friend.
No pressure!

 

Hockey with Josh Hartnett and Eric LeMarque

Trevor Tracy (Josh double) / Eric LeMarque / Josh Hartnett / Vashi Nedomansky

 

Then Scotty dropped a couple huge technical bombs on me. 6 BELOW would be the first entire feature film in the history of Hollywood to be presented in the Barco Escape format. The 7:1 aspect ratio is the widest of any format in 100 years. Three 2K DCPs are projected in sync onto 3 full-sized movie screens to create an incredibly immersive viewing experience.

On top of that, we also had to deliver a 2.76:1 aspect ratio (same as the 70mm version of “The Hateful Eight”) theatrical version for traditional one-screen theaters. That meant two complete separate feature film edits to accommodate for the different framings of each format.

After all that…there was one more surprise that Scotty had waiting for me…

 

Editing for Barco Escape

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07

Oct
2017

No Comments

In 6 Below

By vashi

6 BELOW World Premiere October 12, 2017

On 07, Oct 2017 | No Comments | In 6 Below | By vashi

6 BELOW

Screenshot 2017-10-07 13.51.31

 

I spent 10 months editing 6 BELOW and you only need 97 minutes to enjoy it!

It’s in theaters October 12th and available to stream in HD on October 13th.

I will be posting a breakdown of how I created the first ever 6K Native workflow for a Hollywood feature film here on my blog October 14th.

Until then, here’s a some background on the true story of 6 BELOW…

LOGLINE

When a snowstorm strands former professional hockey player Eric LeMarque atop the Sierra Nevada Mountains for eight days, he is forced to face his past and come to terms with his personal demons in order to survive.

Production still of Josh Hartnett in 6 BELOW

Production still of Josh Hartnett in 6 BELOW

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30

Sep
2017

2 Comments

In Photography

By vashi

Photographing with Expired Overheated and X-rayed 35mm Film

On 30, Sep 2017 | 2 Comments | In Photography | By vashi

 

 

Nikon FE 35mm film camera and Nikon 43-86mm AIS lens

Nikon FE 35mm film camera and Nikon 43-86mm AIS lens

 

My mom handed me her Nikon F2 camera when I was 4-years old and I proceeded to snap some blurry photos of my foot and the wall. I was hooked. A contraption that captured the moment. 40 years later I’m still snapping blurry shots but now on purpose.

 

Nikon F2

Nikon F2

 

Recently I purchased a 5-pack of expired Fuji Velvia 100 35mm color slide film for a trip to Montana. I took a Nikon FE and FE2 film cameras with me and a battered Nikon 43-86mm f3.5 (first version) lens known for its distinct and extreme flares. I ended up shooting only Kodak Portra 400 and Tri-X up there but did go through X-ray security with my film.

On my return to Los Angeles, I shot the Velvia 100 in Culver City and the last couple shots in Palm Springs. The exposed film then sat in my car for a week as the temperature was 120 degrees in the desert. I then send the film to The Dark Room in San Clemente for developing. What I got back blew my mind. These are the untouched scans I received from the lab…

 

Expired Velvia 100 film

Click to enlarge

 

Usually I love to add the distressed, grainy and damaged looks in post to my photography as I’m trying to express a feeling and mood as opposed to worrying about sharpness or focus. This first roll of Velvia went through serious torture before it was developed. I’ve reached out to several professional photographers to ask what could be the cause of the beautiful damage. It’s been narrowed down to but not limited to: expired film, overheated exposed film, x-rays, dirty lens, mold, spores, humidity and dumb luck. Here’s a closer look at some of the shots from roll #1. These are untouched scans with no color correction:

 

DSR_2015-2

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QUENTIN TARANTINO HELICOPTER SHOT SUPERCUT

On 12, Sep 2017 | One Comment | In Cinematography, Uncategorized | By vashi

 

Quentin Tarantino has directed eight feature films.

I love all of them. He has an amazing visual style.

I decided to count all the helicopter shots in his eight films.

The final tally might surprise you:

 

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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Revealing Every Single Shot in “Gone Girl” & “Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” in 1 Image

On 07, Aug 2017 | No Comments | In Average Shot Length, David Fincher | By vashi

 

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

AVERAGE SHOT LENGTH

Analyzing the average shot length (ASL) of films / TV / music videos can be very telling or completely irrelevant. Taken as its own metric…it is just a number. The supposition that action / thriller / sci-fi films genres have a shorter ASL is statistically accurate but that does not mean a longer ASL means less tension, action, drama or intensity. I have been deep-diving into ASL statistics for several years and shared a lot of SHAREABLES to help filmmakers and cinephiles further comprehend the mystery behind the numbers.

 

Average Shot Length of famous directos

 

David Fincher is a precise and peerless filmmaker that accepts nothing short of perfection. On the spectrum of ASL as attributed to directors…he falls on the quicker end. Fincher’s average ASL for feature films can be calculated at 3.87 seconds. No matter what the number and how it compares with other filmmakers…his films never feel rushed. In my opinion, they bloom and play out at a sublime pace that suits each individual film. The amount of craft and care that goes on behind the scenes (and never seen by the audience) is second to none. I’ve been lucky to see the process first hand and helped create the post production workflow for GONE GIRL as his team made the transition to Adobe Premiere Pro from Final Cut 7.

Stephen Follows has an amazing article that further breaks down ASL by genre and number of shots to further delve into the analytics. Here’s a sneak peak at the ASL Genre Breakdown but please visit his site for the full story.

 

Stephen Follows ASL

 

THE FINCHER NUMBERS

Back to David Fincher, it’s important to note that his films I’ve documented have a higher number of average shots than most films. Combining all genres the average feature film has approximately 1200 individual shots. By importing a full-length feature film into Davinci Resolve and using the Scene Detection function…I have been able to automatically recreate all the separate edits in an entire film. I then removed any edits that were created in dissolves or scenes with flashes that would add false edits to the final count. Here are my results.

Click on the images to enlarge to full 8K high resolution:

 

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO – 3.2 AVERAGE SHOT LENGTH

CLICK FOR 8K FULL RESOLUTION IMAGE

CLICK FOR FULL 8K PIXELS WIDE IMAGE

 

 

GONE GIRL – 3.7 AVERAGE SHOT LENGTH

GONE GIRL ASL

CLICK FOR FULL 8K PIXELS WIDE IMAGE

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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07

Aug
2017

No Comments

In Cinematography

By vashi

The American – Anton Corbijn

On 07, Aug 2017 | No Comments | In Cinematography | By vashi

 

Photographer Anton Corbijn photographed the famous U2 album cover of The Joshua Tree and so much more than I could ever mention in this article.

 

The iconic album cover photographed by Anton Corbijn

The iconic album cover photographed by Anton Corbijn

 

His second feature film as a director was The American starring George Clooney. The story of an assassin hiding out in Italy for one last assignment is the short version of a much more layered tale.

 

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

 

Corbijn chose to use epic wide shots to help balance the internal conflict of the lead character and at the same time show his place in the greater scheme of things as microscopic. One of my favorite cuts as a film editor is to go from a close up to a majestic wide shot. It signals a change. Often it is a dramatic change of thought / point of view / location or story point. When done purely through visual means it creates a moment so that you can absorb what just occurred and prepare you for what may yet come.

 

Corbijn uses wide shots as connective tissue to bridge scenes but to also release tension and remind the audience of the beauty of the Italian locations. Here are all his massive vista wide shots in chronological order:

 

CLICK TO ENLARGE FOR FULL RESOLUTION

CLICK FOR 8K HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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25

Jul
2017

2 Comments

In Star Wars
Uncategorized

By vashi

The Empirical Truth of Film versus Digital

On 25, Jul 2017 | 2 Comments | In Star Wars, Uncategorized | By vashi

PIXELS / RESOLUTION / SPATIAL FIDELITY

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

 

THE TRUTH

Steve Yedlin is the DP of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Looper, Brick and numerous other films. His quest and passion for Spatial Fidelity is legendary. He just released an in-depth video analysis of six high-end filmmaking cameras.

His 67-minute video pulls back the curtain on the truths of resolution and image quality that all filmmakers have been struggling with in this constantly evolving technical world. His empirical testing shows that resolution (HD/2K/3K/4K/6K/8K/11k) is not the most important component of image capture and that Spatial Fidelity is by far the most important concept for delivering the ultimate image.

 

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

 

His term “Authoring the Image” encompasses many elements including: resolution, perceived sharpness, pixel count, lens choice, sharpening, compression, perceptual differences, grain, halation, optical aberration and order of operation.

You can watch both parts of his analysis here:
http://yedlin.net/ResDemo/
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03

Jul
2017

One Comment

In Low Budget Filmmaking

By vashi

The Filmmaking Journey – Vashi Nedomansky

On 03, Jul 2017 | One Comment | In Low Budget Filmmaking | By vashi

 

I recently visited ADOBE headquarters in San Francisco to film an episode of their new show “Make It” hosted by my friend Jason Levine.

 

Filming MAKE IT at Adobe headquarters in San Francisco

 

We discussed my journey from professional hockey player to editing 11 feature films in Hollywood and the creative process that spans both worlds.

I share how I starting shooting and editing films with a VHS cameras and decks in the 1980’s all the way up to working on: Deadpool, Gone Girl, 6 Below and Sharknado 2 and more.

Here’s the 16-minute video:
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19

Jun
2017

No Comments

In 1-Page Film School

By vashi

2010: The Year We Make Contact BTS

On 19, Jun 2017 | No Comments | In 1-Page Film School | By vashi

 

2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984) was the sequel to
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and based on the book 2010: Odyssey Two written by Arthur C Clarke.

Director Peter Hyams had experience in Sci-Fi with Capricorn One (1977) and Outland (1981) but bravely took on the unenviable task of following in Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic footsteps. Hyam asked for and received Kubrick’s blessing to direct the sequel…”Don’t be afraid. Just go do your own movie.”

 

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

Hyams and Clarke wrote the script in 1983 on different continents using cutting edge e-mail, Kaypro II computers and dial-up modems.

Shot in 71 days, the special effects included extensive spacecraft models and early CGI all captured with 65mm film.

The original Discovery One 50-foot model from “2001” was destroyed by Kubrick and he kept the original model designs under lock and key. Entertainment Effects Group (EEG) led by Richard Edlund used a 70mm copy of “2001” to analyze, copy and create a new Discovery One model.

 

Read the script:
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