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A Filmmaking Blog | VashiVisuals

06

Feb
2016

No Comments

In Editing
Production

By vashi

SHOOTING RATIOS OF FEATURE FILMS

On 06, Feb 2016 | No Comments | In Editing, Production | By vashi

 

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

 

The Shooting Ratio in filmmaking and television production is the ratio between the total duration of its footage created for possible use in a project and that which appears in its final cut. In the Golden Age of Hollywood (1930-1959), it was normal to have a 10:1 ratio. A 90 minute feature film would have have shot roughly 25 hours of film. Certain directors like Alfred Hitchcock were known to have a 3:1 ratio so he could control the edit by leaving the studio no other options.

The shooting ratio has skyrocketed over the last 20 years. Due to the relative inexpensive nature of digital filmmaking, cameras often shoot for extended periods that cover several takes, resets and everything in-between. Film has always been associated with a more disciplined style of shooting with the camera rolling only between “Action” and “Cut”…well technically between “Speed” and “Cut”!

I have edited 9 feature films over the last 15 years and I can attest to the fact of getting more and more footage into the edit bay on every project. Here’s an infographic that compares 8 films shot over the last 35 years to give you an idea of the actual numbers and ratios.

 

click to enlarge

click to enlarge

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo Read more…

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30

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Cinematography

By vashi

THE 6TH STREET BRIDGE
IN HOLLYWOOD FILMS

On 30, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Cinematography | By vashi

 

6th street bridge

CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

The 6th Street Bridge was built in 1932 by architect Merrill Butler and is currently the longest bridge (3500 feet) in Los Angeles. On January 27, 2016 it closed down and will be demolished in the upcoming weeks. The concrete has become unstable and for safety’s sake it must be rebuilt. The 6th Street Bridge has been an iconic staple in Los Angeles motion picture history and has been used in hundreds of productions.

The last chance for the public to cross the bridge occurred January 26th.

LA Times article

I had the pleasure of shooting a film on the bridge in 2010 and the visuals and angles of downtown Los Angeles make it evident why so many filmmakers have shot this location.

 

Footage from the film PROWL that I shot in 2010.

Footage from the film PROWL that I shot in 2010.

 

No more films will be shot on the historic bridge. We only have the imagery of films such as: Terminator 2, To Live and Die in L.A., The Mask, Drive, Point Blank, Grease and hundreds of others to remind us of this beautiful bridge.

 

Enjoy this video with my favorite films to feature the 6th Street Bridge.

 

 

Until next time…

 

UPDATE:

Enjoy the experimental film 6 shot exclusively on and under the 6th Street Bridge before it was torn down.

 

6 from Gharnasi on Vimeo.

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo Read more…

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28

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Editing

By vashi

EDITING INSIGHTS:
HAIL CAESAR! and DEADPOOL

On 28, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Editing | By vashi

 

Vashi Nedomansky / Tim Miller / Katie McQuerrey / Catherine Farrell

Vashi Nedomansky / Tim Miller / Katie McQuerrey / Catherine Farrell

 

Adobe Premiere Pro was used to edit two of the most anticipated films of 2016. At Sundance 2016, I was part of a panel discussing how we cut HAIL CAESAR! and DEADPOOL.

On January 23rd, 2016 I shared the stage with 3 amazing filmmakers to discuss our films. I worked with Deadpool director Tim Miller for the last 9 months on editorial for the upcoming Marvel Super Hero film. Shot digitally on ARRI, my role as Editorial Consultant was to design the workflow for the post production and train all the editors in properly using Adobe Premiere Pro. With over 1100 VFX shots, the integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects (using Dynamic Link) was critical in keeping the production moving forward.

Hail, Caesar! was shot on film by Roger Deakins and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Editor Katie McQuerrey and Post Production Supervisor Catherine Farrell also used Premiere Pro to edit their film. The Coen brothers have finally transitioned away from Final Cut Pro 7 which they used on the bulk of their previous films.

 

Deadpool Sundance

 

During the 64-minute panel, we discussed our filmmaking experiences with Premiere Pro and shared stories from the trenches in front of a packed house. Enjoy!

 

CLICK ON IMAGE TO PLAY

CLICK ON IMAGE TO PLAY

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo Read more…

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27

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Editing

By vashi

Deadpool Pillow Talk
Sundance Film Festival 2016

On 27, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Editing | By vashi

 

Pillow Talk with Hyla at Sundance Film Festival 2016

Pillow Talk with Hyla at Sundance Film Festival 2016

 

Super host Hyla and I talked about filmmaking and creativity while laying in a bed at the Airbnb Haus on Main Street during the Sundance Film Festival 2016.

We discussed Deadpool, Sundance, film editing and the best way to work with directors. Enjoy!

 

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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22

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Cinemash

By vashi

CINEMASH #4 – The Revenant & The Hateful Eight

On 22, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Cinemash | By vashi

 

CINEMASH – A video essay that points out similarities in cinema.
These similarities can be visual, sonic, story or thematic.
No text or VO allowed. Maximum length of 24 seconds.

 

 

The Revenant & The Hateful Eight both featured snowflakes on your tongue.

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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20

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Cinematography

By vashi

Dramatic Filmmaking With A 2000mm Lens

On 20, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Cinematography | By vashi

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) directed by Tomas Alfredson

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) directed by Tomas Alfredson

 

This beautifully executed shot from Tinker Tailor Solider Spy by DP Hoyte van Hoytema was filmed with a 2000mm lens. This massive telephoto lens compresses the foreground and background so they appear to be very close together. The mile long runway allows the approaching plane to act as the agent of impending doom as a critical secret is revealed in the plot. The 2000mm lens keeps the actors and the plane at relatively the same size and adds incredible tension to the scene.

 

 

I don’t know exactly which lens was used…but here’s a Nikon 2000mm f11 lens from 1970 as an example.

 

2000mm_2

Nikon 2000mm f11 telephoto lens

 

It is 2 feet long and weights 39 pounds. This one sold for $32,777 on eBay.

 

2000mm lens shot from Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

2000mm lens shot from Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

 

Creating tension and dramatic moments in filmmaking can be accomplished in many different ways. Lens choice and cinematography are the tools used in this specific example. The take-away is to put some extra forethought into your own choices before you shoot…so on the day you can confidently create impactful shots, story points and dramatic moments.

 

Until next time…

 

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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19

Jan
2016

No Comments

In Editing

By vashi

Editing Deadpool with Adobe Premiere Pro

On 19, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Editing | By vashi

 

If you’re coming to Sundance 2016 then join me for a free panel discussion on the editing of DEADPOOL and HAIL, CAESAR! using Adobe Premiere Pro.

 

Deadpool Sundance

CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

The panel is 3:30pm this Saturday, January 23rd at the AirBnB Haus on Main Street in Park City. I will be explaining how we set up and implemented the Premiere Pro workflow with director Tim Miller and how his entire post production team made the switch from Avid Media Composer to Adobe Premiere Pro. Read more…

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The Fastest Cut: Furious Film Editing

On 14, Jan 2016 | No Comments | In Average Shot Length, Cinematography, Editing | By vashi

 

 

The Fastest Cut

 

 

The average film has around 1250 individual shots. Action films and Blockbusters often have more than 3000 individual shots. This can be attributed to the ongoing trend of Chaos Cinema and the tendency to create false pace and momentum by simply cutting so frequently that it constantly bombards the viewer with new shots and information. This can become overwhelming and it creates a disconnected and jumbled viewing experience that assaults the audience. The frenetic pace exists but the audience can become exhausted as the eye and brain try to make sense of the imagery.

 

6 extremely quick cut films

6 extremely quick cut films

 

My most popular post of 2015 was MAD MAX: CENTER FRAMED which explained the cinematography and editing techniques used in MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. Even though it had roughly 3000 individual shots, the action and story is comprehensible and digestible while still viscerally effective. Fast editing and ASLs (Average Shot Length) of around 2 seconds does not have to be a visual debris tornado that hammers the viewer. Properly planned shots and diligent editing can result in an energetic AND quickly paced film that tells a coherent story.

 

 

The AVERAGE SHOT LENGTH (ASL) in seconds

The AVERAGE SHOT LENGTH (ASL) in seconds

 

To make this point even more evident…I have compiled 5 films that average 2 seconds per shot and average 3000 shots per film. They are being played back in their entirety at 12X speed. The resulting video is 10 minutes long. Only one of these films remains comprehensible at this speed. You don’t have to watch the whole video…feel free to scroll through and view different sections and compare the films. You will see that the painstaking craftsmanship of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD survives the massive speed up.

Enjoy the video:

 

 

This bird’s eye view at high speed is something I often use as an editor to help judge the pacing and visual variety of my own work. By pushing the boundary of human information intake, it helps me spot trends, patterns and gives me an overall feeling of the visual mosaic I am creating at that moment. By speeding up the footage I can literally see WHERE in the frame the energy and emphasis exists and I use that information to my advantage.

 

Congratulations to editor Margaret Sixel on her 2016 Oscar nomination for Best Film Editing!

 

Until next time…

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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The Hateful Eight – Ultra Panavision 70

On 29, Dec 2015 | No Comments | In Low Budget Filmmaking, Uncategorized | By vashi

 

The Hateful Eight (2015)

The Hateful Eight (2015)

 

The Hateful Eight resurrects the glorious Ultra Panavision 70 format with the uber-wide 2:76 aspect ratio. The 65mm film used to capture the format combined with 1.25x anamorphic lenses creates the final wide image projected at 70mm. Most of us have never and probably will never shoot in the Ultra Panavision 70 format but that doesn’t mean we can’t replicate the aspect ratio.

 

The claustrophobic cabin

The claustrophobic cabin

 

In my Ultimate Aspect Ratio Guide post I gave examples of 70 different film formats and aspect ratios. I included 72 FREE aspect ratios templates.

In honor of the glorious return of the Ultra Panavision 70 aspect ratio…

I’ve packaged the 2:76 templates in all 8 resolutions for your next project.

These PNGs (HD/2K/3K/UHD/4K/5K/6K) will work in any NLE or VFX software.

Just drag and drop above your footage.

 

Download: 276_Ultra70mm

 

Apply the PNG template above your footage.

Apply the PNG template above your footage.

 

Even dialog sounds better in 70mm

Even dialog sounds better in 70mm

 

Until next time…

vashivisuals.com

@vashikoo

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16

Dec
2015

No Comments

In Cinemash

By vashi

CINEMASH #3 – Video Essay

On 16, Dec 2015 | No Comments | In Cinemash | By vashi

 

CINEMASH – A video essay that points out similarities in cinema.
These similarities can be visual, sonic, story or thematic.
No text or VO allowed. Maximum length of 24 seconds.

 

 

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Star Wars IV

Star Wars VII

THX 1138

 

More coming soon!

Feel free to make your own and share with the tag #cinemash

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